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Former Aetna ShareholdersFormer Coventry StockholdersGeneralStock

2006 Stock Split (Aetna)

2005 Stock Split (Aetna)

Dividends (History former Aetna Shareholders)
  • Can you provide a record of Aetna’s dividend history?


    Former Aetna Shareholders


    Where can I get information on Aetna’s acquisition by CVS Health?
    Please click here.

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    Former Coventry Stockholders


    Where can I get information about the exchange of my Coventry Stock?
    Please click here for answers to frequently asked questions about the exchange of your Coventry stock for the merger consideration.

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    Where can I get additional tax reporting information on the merger consideration?
    Click here for supplemental tax reporting information on the merger consideration Coventry Stockholders received for their Coventry Stock.

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    General (Aetna)


    When was Aetna's initial public offering and what was the opening price?
    The history of Aetna goes back to the early 1850's, however, the Aetna Inc. (AET) of today began trading on December 14, 2000. The opening price on December 14, 2000 was $8.5313 and the closing price was $8.6094 (prices adjusted for the 2005 and 2006 stock splits).

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    In what year and where was Aetna incorporated?
    The history of Aetna goes back to the early 1850's, however, the Aetna Inc. (AET) of today was incorporated in Pennsylvania on December 20, 1982.

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    How can I get information on the sale of the financial services and international businesses to ING Groep N.V?
    Please click here to refer to the Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Receipt of the Cash Consideration and Shares of the New Health Care Company document for information regarding the spin off of Aetna Inc.'s domestic health care businesses to its shareholders and sale of its financial services and international businesses to ING America Insurance Holdings, Inc. Click here to view Computershare's letter to Aetna shareholders regarding 1099B tax forms. To access Aetna's Corporate Shareholder Services area for additional questions and assistance, please click here .

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    Stock (Former Aetna Shareholders)


    How can I get a history of Aetna's closing stock prices?
    Click here for prices since December 13, 2000. Data and information is provided for informational purposes only, and is not intended for trading purposes. Aetna Inc. shall not be liable for any errors in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

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    How can I get historical stock information on the "former" Aetna? *
    Click here for price information on the "former" Aetna stock. Data and information is provided for informational purposes only, and is not intended for trading purposes. Aetna Inc. shall not be liable for any errors in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

    * Prior to December 13, 2000, Aetna Inc. (a Pennsylvania corporation) and its wholly owned subsidiaries (collectively, the "Company"), was a subsidiary of a Connecticut corporation named Aetna Inc. ("former Aetna"). On December 13, 2000, former Aetna spun off shares of the Company to shareholders (of former Aetna). Simultaneously, former Aetna, which was then comprised of former Aetna's financial services and international businesses, was merged with a newly formed subsidiary of ING Groep N.V. ("ING").


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    2006 Stock Split (Aetna)

     

    What is a two-for-one stock split?
    In a two-for-one stock split, effected as a stock dividend, the shareholder receives one additional share for each share he or she owns.

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    What is the difference between a two-for-one stock split and a stock dividend?
    They are effectively the same. In both cases, shareholders will own twice as many shares.

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    How does a two-for-one stock split actually work?
    After a two-for-one stock split, shareholders receive an additional share for every share they currently own and will therefore have twice as many shares after the split as before the split. Accordingly, the price of each share will be roughly half the previous price, though the total value of the holdings immediately after the split will be the same as before the split. For example, a shareholder who owns 100 Common Shares of Aetna at a market price of $95 as of the Record Date has a total value of $9,500. After the split, this shareholder will own 200 shares valued at approximately $47.50 per share for a total investment value of $9,500. The shareholder's investment value remains the same until the stock price moves up or down.

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    When was the Record Date?
    February 7, 2006

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    When was the Distribution Date?
    February 17, 2006

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    When did Aetna stock begin trading on a split basis only?
    On February 21, 2006, also known as the "Ex"-Date.

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    What exactly did I receive?
    For each Aetna Common Share held of record at the close of business on February 7, 2006, you will receive one additional share of Aetna stock. Since the stock split shares are being issued to registered shareholders in book-entry form rather than in the form of a stock certificate, holders of record will not receive a new stock certificate representing the additional stock split shares.

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    Are the stock split shares subject to federal income tax?
    We have been advised by counsel that, under present federal income tax laws, your receipt of shares issued under this distribution is not taxable as income to you. However, if you sell any shares, this distribution must be considered in figuring the tax basis of your shares to determine your gain or loss for federal income tax purposes. For example, if prior to the dividend you own 100 shares with a basis of $50 per share, half of the basis in each of those shares would be allocated to the corresponding new share, resulting in a basis of $25 per share for each of the 200 shares owned after the split. For tax purposes, the holding period of the new shares is the same as for the old shares on which they were issued.

    Under existing U.S. laws and regulations, the new shares issued will have a basis equal to one-half the adjusted cost or other basis of the shares on which they were distributed. The basis for computing gain or loss concerning the balance of your stock is reduced to one-half of its former basis. For tax purposes, the holding period for the new shares is the same as for the old shares on which they were issued. Although this tax information is provided for your assistance, we are not providing personal tax advice. You should consult your personal tax advisor regarding the tax consequences of any transaction you undertake with these shares.

    Consult your Personal Tax Advisor: The information contained on the Aetna website does not constitute tax advice. It does not purport to be complete or to describe the consequences that may apply to particular categories of shareholders. You should consult your own tax advisor regarding the calculation of your tax basis and the tax consequences of any distribution.

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    Who can I contact for additional information?
    Click here for a listing of contacts.

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    2005 Stock Split (Aetna)

    When was the Record Date?
    February 25, 2005

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    When was the Distribution Date?
    March 11, 2005

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    When did Aetna stock begin trading on a split basis only?
    On March 14, 2005, also known as the "Ex"-Date.

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    What exactly did I receive?
    For each Aetna Common Share held of record at the close of business on February 25, 2005, you received one additional share of Aetna stock. Since the stock split shares were issued to registered shareholders in book-entry form rather than in the form of a stock certificate, holders of record did not receive a new stock certificate representing the additional stock split shares.
    This means that your shares were credited to an account registered in your name on the books of Aetna, which are maintained by Aetna's transfer agent, Computershare Trust Company, N.A., rather than sent to you in physical stock certificate form. On or about March 11, 2005, Aetna's transfer agent sent to registered holders a personalized Stock Distribution Statement about their new book-entry shares including any shares held in the DirectSERVICE Investment Program.


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    Are the stock split shares subject to federal income tax?
    We have been advised by counsel that, under present federal income tax laws, your receipt of shares issued under this distribution is not taxable as income to you. However, if you sell any shares, this distribution must be considered in figuring the tax basis of your shares to determine your gain or loss for federal income tax purposes. For example, if prior to the dividend you own 100 shares with a basis of $50 per share, half of the basis in each of those shares would be allocated to the corresponding new share, resulting in a basis of $25 per share for each of the 200 shares owned after the split. For tax purposes, the holding period of the new shares is the same as for the old shares on which they were issued.

    Under existing U.S. laws and regulations, the new shares issued will have a basis equal to one-half the adjusted cost or other basis of the shares on which they were distributed. The basis for computing gain or loss concerning the balance of your stock is reduced to one-half of its former basis. For tax purposes, the holding period for the new shares is the same as for the old shares on which they were issued. Although this tax information is provided for your assistance, we are not providing personal tax advice. You should consult your personal tax advisor regarding the tax consequences of any transaction you undertake with these shares.

    Consult your Personal Tax Advisor: The information contained on the Aetna Web site does not constitute tax advice. It does not purport to be complete or to describe the consequences that may apply to particular categories of shareholders. You should consult your own tax advisor regarding the calculation of your tax basis and the tax consequences of any distribution.


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    Who can I contact for additional information?
    Click here for a listing of contacts.

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    Dividends (History former Aetna Shareholders)


    Can you provide a record of Aetna’s dividend history?
    Click here to view the current and historical dividend rate.

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